How it Works

Double the difference you are making in your community by donating your election pay to a charity of your choice. 

STEP 1

Pick a charity to support

CanadaHelps.org is a non-profit that
co-ordinates donations to Canadian charities (
4,314 in Saskatchewan).

STEP 2

Tell us where to send your election pay

Fill out a form at your training session prior to the election. The charity receives a donation in your name.

STEP 3

Receive your charitable receipt

Your receipt arrives after the election. 

FAQs

A: If you are interested in donating your election pay to charity, you will need to tell us the percentage of your net pay that you want to donate (can be 1 to 100%) and then tell us what charity you want to donate to (we will need the charity’s registration number and name). You will also need to provide us with an email address so that we can send you your charitable donation tax receipt. All this information can be provided to us when you fill out the payroll forms at your election training session.

A: This program is intended for any individual who wants to work in the upcoming election, and chooses to donate their net compensation to a charity of their choice. This program also has a fundraising appeal to non-profit service organizations, employers and faith organizations that wish to gather a group of their regular members or employees to serve as election workers and donate their compensation to the same registered charity.

A: CanadaHelps is a non-profit organization that serves Canadian charities and donors. More information about CanadaHelps can be found at www.canadahelps.org.
Elections SK has chosen to partner with CanadaHelps to facilitate the donation of election pay to any registered charity in Canada.

A: Not everyone who participates in an election considers it to be work; many people want to be involved in the election because they believe in the democratic process and want to be a part of it.
Saskatchewan’s spirit of building local communities combined with the desire to help others creates a perfect opportunity to allow people to be involved in the democratic process while at the same time, making a significant impact to another cause.

A: Yes. This program applies to any election worker who wishes to donate all, or part, of their net pay to a registered charity.

A: Not at all. Elections Saskatchewan values everyone who supports our efforts, including returning officers and their staff as well as the close to 10,000 workers we require on election day.
Elections are a community endeavour that requires us to come together as a group and work for a common cause. Many charities are built on the same principles. By working Election Day and donating your net earnings, you can accomplish two similar goals with one generous action. You always have the choice to keep your election earnings as earnings for yourself.

A: Yes. You can donate to any charity registered with the Canada Revenue Agency’s list of active charities. A complete list of charities can be found at:
http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/haip/srch/basicsearchresult-eng.action?k=&s=registered&p=1&b=true
or at
https://www.canadahelps.org/en/donate/#find

A: You can donate to any charity registered with Canada Revenue Agency.

A: Election workers have always had the opportunity to pool their earnings and donate it to the organization of their choice, whether it is a registered charity or not. In order to take advantage of our program that allows for a donation to be deducted from your election pay and remitted directly to a charity, you must choose a registered charity.

A: You will receive a tax receipt via email to confirm that your donation was sent to the charity of your choice. You can follow up with the charity itself if you want to further confirm your donation.

A: Yes. You must provide an email address to Election SK if you want to donate all or a portion of you net pay to a charity. After payroll has been processed and the donation has been made, you will receive a charitable donation receipt via email from CanadaHelps.
If you will be receiving pay in multiple payperiods, your donations will be aggregated and processed by CanadaHelps in the pay period after the election.

A: You are free to choose whatever amount of your net election pay you wish to donate. When you fill out the payroll form during your in-person election training session, indicate the percentage of your net pay you wish to donate.

A: At your in-person training session in March, you will fill out a form that tells us what charity is receiving your donation, and for how much.

A: You can get your employment forms sent to you electronically from your returning officer. You cannot submit your forms electronically but you can fill them out in advance and bring them with you to you training session.

A: Your individual tax situation will depend on your taxable income, your deductions and how much you have donated to charities in the past. Canada Revenue Agency offers a charitable donation tax credit calculator http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/chrts-gvng/dnrs/svngs/clmng1b2-eng.html.

Below is an example for illustrative purposes only. The individual in this scenario is in the highest tax bracket has worked as a poll clerk at a regular or advance poll and is not eligible for the additional federal tax credit available for donors who have contributed less than $1,000 over their lifetime.

Please consult your accountant regarding your specific tax situation.

Scenario: Employee has no other charitable donations and is in the highest tax bracket

 Poll Clerk – Regular Poll

 Poll Clerk – Advance Poll

Elections Saskatchewan pay

$185

$597

Tax payable (Highest tax bracket) – 44%

$81

$263

Net pay being donated

$104

$334

 

 

 

Total tax savings to employee*

$27

$146

 

 

 

Net tax payable

$54

$117

*Amount of non-refundable tax credit cannot exceed taxes owed

 

A poll worker earning annual income in excess of $125,000 would receive net pay of $104 and would pay $81 in tax.  If this worker opts to donate their net pay of $104 to a charity, their tax payable would be reduced to $54, a tax savings of $27.